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in changing religious laws in america, i guess? >> guest: well, the salvation army, which people don't realize, is an evangelical religious group, not just a group that rings bells outside department stores in the christmas season. the salvation army believed in what they called the cathedral of the open air and would go into areas, especially impoverished areas, and have parades and make lots of noise with brass bands and cymbals, and loud preaching trying to attract, especially the urban poor, back into religious life. this came up against requirements of many cities that any parade be permitted, and the salvation army made it a practice not to apply for permits, and to be arrested, often playing instruments into the way into the cell, and challenges laws as anti-religious, and they won and lost a lot of them. they destabilized the law of the states by challenging these restrictions, and they never really made it to the supreme court of the united states, though, because the states were still in power. >> host: professor gordon, when did the first major religious case come before the supreme
the wealthiest men in america, merchants, among them, john hancock, yes, thee bold john hancock on the declaration of independence whose name is synonymous with signature. long before that, he was arguably the wealthiest merchant banker in america living on beacon hill with a commanding view of the massachusetts landscape and sea scape. far from espousing individual liberty, hancock and his fellow merchants in new england, governed their businesses and communities with economic ruthlessness that often left their competitors homeless and penniless. like today's tea party movement, the colonial tea party had almost nothing to do with tea. tea was nothing more than a social beverage for wealthy women. men seldom draping it, and it ranked below ail and rum among beverages americans consumed most. the tea party movement that sparked the american revolution actually began 20 years earlier in the 1750s and 1760s when new england business leaders like today's tea party supported a costly government war, but refused to pay higher taxes to cover the cost of that war. the war had started i
at this is basically something that you can ride along and freeload and let america and canada and japan handled? >> steve, your question -- >> i'm and freeload, by the way. >> that by the way is how the chinese would describe any relationship between japan and america. the interesting aspect of all these conflicts is that as india and china and india and china have a proximate geographically, but we've never been neighbors. >> right. >> in order to be neighbors you either have to love each other or hate each other. we have done neither. in fact, in 1962 during the first strategic conflict, between these two, you have to understand, it's hard to understand why we are not neighbors. [inaudible] in terms of inaccessible. but the positions, the lines, the strategies, the lines, what would they resonate to? the positions that are taken by postcolonial nations is that we will not be bound by decisions made by colonial powers. one, or in china's case, that we had to abandon our national positions. and now that we are strong, we need to resurrect them. right or wrong is not, that is very little to do w
. .. there would be a change in mr. dsm point, that that might affect america. as the senate are not aware that any change to the treaty in order to go into effect and has any impact on the united states would require the nascent consent? without the advice and consent of the senate, no change could possibly impact united states. >> outhouses the bureaucrats running the program would have clarification word is otherwise vague. the point i am making here is we don't really need to do that when we have her hearing. i understand there's a difference of opinion on this and a lot of motion. i found this morning's roll call magazine, all the people find appeared with the distinguished senator from massachusetts. it doesn't say anything in the articles that certainly attacks the emotions of individuals. so yes, i am not satisfied they would not interfere and do their clarification to change the intent. >> we've taken care of our problem here. >> the mr. president, it's important in this kind of debate as to make a judgment as senators that we base our judgment on facts than on the reality. the senator has
and to that point you talk about guns as an infectious disease in america. we have 300 million guns in america. almost one per citizen. is the disease too far in to the body to really do something? we have senator feinstein talking about banning assault weapons and can't talk about retroactively banning. we can only talk about going forward. are there too many guns for america to be able to go back? >> i don't really think so at all. we can make a big dent. i can talk about where i'm from which is massachusetts and we have sensible gun control laws and it's very hard for criminals in massachusetts to get guns from massachusetts and so what they have to do is somebody brings guns in to them from new hampshire and vermont and then south carolina up the iron pipeline. we would do very well in massachusetts if we had a one gun per month law nationally to make it so it's not profitable to bring guns in to the inner city gangs. i think there's lots of things to do. and i just want to mention one thing which gun owners can do. we are trying to push this notion of the 11th commandment of gun safety an
that have made america a beacon of hope and freedom. many yearn for basic human liberties. the people of western sa harrah have been trapped in oppressive conditions under the puppet regime. the front has instituted masked kidnappings of people from their homes into western algeria. they have been in prison in camps for 35 years. the front colbrates with the likes of cuba who ration food in the camp and indoctor rin ate children while partnering with al qaeda. they have a plan, which i will submit for the record that addresses these issues with a clear and democratic solution to the sa harrah crisis. this is where america support should lie. mr. speaker, the united states can and must continue to advance fundamental human rights as we in this chamber continue to work together for peace, justice and human dignity in the western sahara. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. are there further requests for one-minute speeches? the house will be in order. members and staff, remove your conversations off the floor. under the speaker's announced policy o
. the nominations are closed. the balloting will proceed for the vice-president of the united states of america. will the vice presidential please ask the amount. electors, please mark your ballot in writing for vice president, and please do not forget to sign your ballot. will the vice presidential teller please collect the ballots from the electors hammon? >> the electoral votes of north carolina have been passed on this, the 17th day of december, 2012, through the republican electors, and the result is as follows. votes cast in the name of paul ryan. >> thank you. with secretary marshall please bring forth the certificates to vote. each elector or will have to sign six copies. i believe we are going to sign one copy, and if at the end the electors will remain seated, we will sign the other five copies. >> the electors having signed a certificate of the vote, at this point i would like to thank the staff of the state capital, the secretary of state's office, and the north carolina republican's staff as well as the north carolina republican party as well as the voters of north carolina for hel
concerned women for america who still claims to be the largest women's political organizational in the united states and she based her organization on five spiritual principles in the bible the family and the patriotism the sanctity of marriage and safety of life and religious parents should have more control for example and what they're taught in school are doing that the equal rights amendment for the wedding was a violation of the fundamental orders of things and winning many of these cases. >> did you interview her for your bookracks. >> she is still in seclusion. she retired about almost 15 years ago and lives in california again. >> somebody would have liked to talk to? >> i would very much like to talk to her, and one of the things i think is really important is that an organization like hers which was so involved, so foundational to the conservative women political activism in the papers are not deposited anywhere. they are not available to be read. other women, if phillys schlaffley and the like beverley and the concerned women for america desert substantially more atte
senator that's done more to help america's heroes adjust to life after the military. that's just one of the reasons why she will be sorely missed. here's another reason, though: kay has fought time and time again to promote tax relief for hardworking texas families. in thehooin the mid-1990's, shed create the so-called homemaker ira to make sure that stay-at-home moms and dads were able to save for their retirement on an equal basis with their counterparts who worked outside the home. i now it is one of her proudest achievements and i'm proud to join with the senator from merrell, senator barbara mikulski, in attempting to rename this ira the kay bailey hutchison spousal ira in her honor, and i hope, mr. president, we can join together and honor senator hutchison by getting that done before we close out our business this year. kay, of course, has always championed the state sales tax deduction, which may not seem like a big deal to others in this carriage carriages but it . but it is a big deal in texas. we don't have a state income tax. but we do pay a state sales tax. and of course
disgraceful. george will is one of the most recognizable people in america today. certainly, the most widely known intellectual. he is the author of the least a dozen books. since the early days of the show, he has been a regular on what is now "this week with george stephanopoulos." he is an astute philosopher. he is a native of illinois, a student of baseball, a lifelong cubs fan, and as such, he is a man of sorrows and acquainted with grief. [laughter] [applause] despite their rudeness of the invitation, he is my friend. george well. -- will. [applause] >> jack's invitation is perfectly acceptable. my dear friend william f. buckley once called up his friend charleton heston, the actor, and said chuck, do you believe in free speech? he said, of course. he said good, you are about to give one. it is a delight to be back here. it is a delight to be back on campus. long ago and far away, i was a college professor. in 1976, two of my friends ran for the senate against each other in new york state. the night they were both nominated, jim buckley got up and said, i look forward to running agains
a burst of wildberry flavor. now why make a flavored heartburn pill? because this is america. and we don't just make things you want, we make things you didn't even know you wanted. like a spoon fork. spray cheese. and jeans made out of sweatpants. so grab yourself some new prilosec otc wildberry. [ male announcer ] one pill each morning. 24 hours. zero heartburn. satisfaction guaranteed or your money back. >>> nobody can get 100% of what they want and this is not simply a contest in terms of parties in terms of who looks good who doesn't. there are real world consequences to what we do here. >> after that the president moved to hawaii and that's where he is today. the congress is back home for the holidays and you have the fiscal cliff, that's still looming and as they call for armed guards in all of the nation's schools we'll talk to kasim reed, mayor of atlanta and one of the people around the country who say we need fewer gun, not more. >>> as millions travel home for the holidays, stay tuned for that. good day. i'm richard lui at the top of the hour and just two days to go before th
of america. every time you come to this floor it's a question, why are we here? we are here to do the people's work. let's sit down. get it done. and move forward. instead of filling the agenda however worthy some of those initiatives may be, instead of not along with passing a middle income tax -- this is also reminiscent of a year ago. the president proposed, the house and senate, democrats and republicans, voted for the payroll tax holiday. the republicans in the house resisted. painted themselves into a corner until they had no choice. the issue had been made too hot for them to handle and they finally had to come around to supporting the payroll tax holiday. and here we are again. 100% of the american people will receive a tax cut when we pass the middle income tax cut. the wealthiest people in our country will receive a tax cut up to their income of $250,000. we are asking them to pay a little bit more for what they make over $250,000 a year. to help reduce the deficit, to help grow the economy, grow the economy. that growth is what is essential. you want to reduce the deficit, create
of america shared in that growth. by making education affordable, by fostering innovation and job creation, and providing economic security to retirees through medicare and social security, our country went from a paralyzing great depression to an economic superpower. we were able to accomplish such a drastic transformation because we were willing to consider revenue as a way to invest in the future, as a way to promise security to our seniors -- economic security to our seniors. focusing spending on policies that work and balancing revenue is at the core of this debate. i've made tough choices in the 1990's that balance the budget, generated a surplus and supported robust job creation. in january of 1993, unemployment stood at 7.3%. in january 2001, that rate had been reduced to 3.9%. that period of record growth also saw an important decline in the poverty rate. in 1993, 15.1% of americans were in poverty. but thanks to job growth and an expanding economy, based upon a balanced approach to deficit reduction, including revenue and targeted reduction in expenditures, poverty fell to 11.3%
, there will be something about infrastructure because we need to improve our economy and put america forward. that's the way to create these jobs and infrastructure to get us oftf of this fiscal cliff. >> congressman steve cohen, thank you for your time tonight. >> thanks, rev. >> always good to be with you. >> still ahead, the tea party built john boehner up. and, now, they're tearing him down. how should democrats respond to the mess? the right wing has created. but, first, we're saying good-bye to the so-called war on christmas. we found a republican lawmaker who actually takes this stuff serious. stay with us. ♪ ♪ ♪ [ male announcer ] everyone deserves the gift of all day pain relief. this season, discover aleve. all day pain relief with just two pills. >>> with christmas just days away, i wanted to update you on one of my favorite holiday traditions. the right wing war on christmas. they've really gotten into the spirit this season. >> we are pretty much the only ones covering the so-called war on christmas. >> let's talk about the war on christmas. >> we're not nuts, are we? there is a
, and south america and the various countries were beginning to rebel against spanish king and the french team and they were going to send and put down rebellions in english would keep the french from growing to south america. they invited americans to join in keeping the french out of south america because south america was rich with all the gold and silver. john quincy adams was secretary of state and said absolutely not, were not going to get involved in foreign wars. we're not going to let them come over here either. the seeds were planted for the monroe doctrine. it was part of monroe's annual message and he announced his cabinet for help in putting together some sort of statement, making our international policy clear. john quincy adams wrote the corporate vision of god. there are three long paragraphs that now call the monroe doctrine. he tells the europeans he does not want to get involved in wars. we don't want anything to do. you stay out of our affairs. the band of the colonial era had come to an end. you can no longer consider americas as father for colonial aspirations and any att
and lactose intolerance on america this morning. jon by the way has a big show. senators chuck schumer and jon kyl on "this week." a lot of news developing overnight. we go to mr. ron claiborne who has extraordinary videotape. >> out of russia. a plane crash outside of moscow. we'll begin with this stunning video. the plane overshot the runway and careened into traffic and abc has the story. >> reporter: you're about to see the terrifying moment of impact as the russian passenger jet slams into a busy highway. watch again. you can see the plane's tire colliding with the moving car. and listen closely. you can hear the squealing brakes and crushing metal. the crash took place on saturday at an airport outside moscow. the red wing's airline's flight broke through a barrier fence shattering into three pieces and bursting into flames before skidding to a stop at the edge of the highway. witnesses rushed to pull survivors out of the wreckage. the russian made tupolev 204 was flying back from the czech republic with no passengers and eight crew members on board. officials say four of them were kille
enemy america has -- at is our first president, george washington. >> i think george washington said this when he was up in massachusetts in the beginning of december 1775 or maybe late november. communications were slow in these days. washington, in the point in time, probably the most recent things he knew about done more -- about dunmore was probably as close to the peak of his power in virginia because ultimately he was chased out of virginia. but during the summer and fall of 1775, he was very effective in sending out troops to read plantations. -- to read plantations. he was during of the indians. they could find refuge and get the fleet of the british army. even stirred up the instruction of indentured servants. not only did look like he might succeed, but there were rumors that he would ascend the party in the area of alexandria, va irginia. george washington is up there in massachusetts were about his wife. even thomas jefferson were about his wife at the same time. and i put that in. i did not dwell on it. i think it is a footnote or something like that. but washington had
:00 p.m. eastern on c-span3. >> a report by the group securing america's future energy says the greatest threat to national and economic security is dependence on foreign oil. members of the group, business political and retired military leaders are suggesting a plan of maximizing oil and gas production, reducing consumption, and improving conservation as a way to boost revenue and reduce our debt. this is a little less than an hour and a half. >> good morning, everyone. thank you all for coming. i especially want to thank the members of the leadership council that could be with us here today. they've been a distinguished group of people working on this issue since 2006. we're nothing without their credibility as the great c.e.o.'s, entrepreneurs and military leaders of our time. i also want to give a special thanks to the staff at securing america's future energy. really we stand on their shoulders, all of us, and the hard work that they -- and the time that they spent to put these reports in conjunction with the energy security leadership council, the policy staff, jonna hamilton, jame
. host: the stories are "the in- sourcing boom" and "mr. china comes to america. both can be found at theatlantic.com. thanks for joining us. we will take you live to the house floor. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2012] the speaker pro tempore: the house will be in order. the chair lays before the house a communication from the speaker. the clerk: the speaker's room, washington, d.c., december 19, 2012. i hereby appoint the honorable daniel webster to act as speaker pro tempore on this day. signed, john a. boehner, speaker of the house of representatives. the speaker pro tempore: the chair will receive a message. the messenger: mr. speaker, a message from the senate. the secretary: mr. speaker. the speaker pro tempore: madam secretary. the secretary: i have been directed by the senate to inform the house that the senate has agreed to s. res. 624, relative to the death of the honorable daniel k. inouye, senator from the state of ohio. -- hawaii. the speaker pro tempore: pursuant to the order of the house of
signs advertising them. and in doing so, they tell every insane killer in america that schools are the safest place to inflict maximum mayhem with minimum risk. >> lapierre went on to blame the media for what we have been seeing in terms of mass murders. we'll talk to the media critic with "the washington post." he's standing by for that angle for me. first, tom foreman, to you in washington. we heard lapierre speaking minutes upon minutes upon minutes how it is uniquely prepared to help, train people, arm every school in the nation. i want to know from you, how is washington reacting now to what he said today? >> well, you know, i'll tell you something, washington reacts cautiously to anything the nra says. i'll tell you why. yes, there is a national sense right now of people wanting to say we should do something about this and maybe some kind of gun laws would make a difference as the president mentioned. there has been a slight tick in the polls in favor of that. but, washington is aware for 20 years, public opinion has been running the other way. gallop tracked the fact tha
god bless you and god bless america. [applause] >> tomorrow morning a look at foreign policy in 2012. then the biggest political stories of 2012 with fox news political analyst juan williams. washington juren live every day at 7:00 a.m. eastern on c-span. >> the senate runches for legislative business on thursday and the house has a proform asession scheduled that day. the first would extend provisions of the fisa act. the other is a pack abbling for areas affected by hurricane sandy. you can follow live coverage of the senate on c-span2. and house members are on stand by as negotiations continue over the so-called fiscal cliff. >> now a conversation on hollywood's portrayal of politics and policy making in movies and tv shows. among those we'll hear from the crete or the of the show "homeland." this is an hour 20 minutes. >> good evening again. welcome back to the forum. i'm not the one you'll be applauding for. you know we have public events, public forums in our headquarters campus about once a month. and we've had former presidents and foreign ministers and ambassadors an
are not throwing america's seniors over the cliff to get a tax cut for the wealthiest people of america. we have clarity on that. host: sarah kliff? guest: the eligibility age quickly shaping up to be a big issue for the fiscal cliff. house republicans have said this is something they want to come out of these negotiations. congressional democrats, one of the top senators, has said we are not on board with it. it is difficult to see where that issue lands. what that will mean even chile is moving the age up to 67 -- will mean eventually is moving the age up to 67. host: the issue of spending, a large majority goes to these programs, medicare and medicaid, social security. speaker boehner was speaking about that yesterday. >> i am not concerned about my job. i am concerned about doing the right thing for our kids and grandkids. if we do not fix this spending problem, their future is going to be rather bleak. host: this doc fix will cost potentially $25 billion. where is the debate heading? guest: it is heading into the holiday season as there seems to be an impasse between the two political parti
's bring in bloomberg "newsweek" senior writer and is the author of "glock the rise of america's gun." the nra blamed everything but the gigantic number of guns in america a situation which they worked very hard to create. they blamed video games, music, nobody watches music videos any more. they had the audacity to roll out a new product guns for every school. that's good for business. are you surprised of the tact they took today >> yeah. even i was surprised and i've written about these issues for many years. i thought the nra was going to be conciliatory for at least a day two. the fact they went straight to the mattresses and declared war on everybody in sight from the media to political elites was surprising. and i think they've just chosen a strategy that they are going to preach to their base and go for the fundraising and that's what we saw today. >> paul, let's talk about one of the specific measures that's been proposed which is a reinstatement of the assault weapons ban from the '90s. i've been somewhat skeptical that's the right political approach because i think the bat
>>> good morning, america. this morning, buried in more than a foot of snow. look at this. a 20-car pileup and the cancellation boards at the airport, and now the coldest temperatures of the year are setting in. ginger has the forecast. >>> over the cliff? with just two days to go, congressional leaders try to come up with a plan to block deep budget cuts and prevent everyone's taxes from going up. is there any progress this morning? >>> moment of impact. this is not a movie. extraordinary new videotape coming in overnight as a passenger jet overshoots the runway and careens onto the highway. how did this happen? >>> and serenading a president. ♪ amazing grace >> hear the emotional song sung for president george h.w. bush by country superstars while his family held vigil at his hospital bed. >>> ah, the oak ridge boys, one of the former president's favorite bands getting a serenade getting together for the president who was in the hospital singing "amazing grace" and their big hit, "elvira," through the phone. great news. their serenade seemed to bring some good luck. the former p
america and so do our chair people. half of our chairman will be women and minorities. and some of it is historic. we have our senior democrat be maxine waters on financial services. the chairman of what we used to call the powerful appropriations committee, that's just the beginning of it. women across the board in chairmanship. >> there's been so much made about christmas and the holiday that congress is notorious for taking it up to the last 11th hour and doing something to get out of town. do you want to respond to that? >> i think that's an irresponsible position. and again, we're waiting for the republicans to come to the table seriously. not to toy with the christmas holiday, but to let people have confidence to buy toys. the consumers are waiting to hear that markets are waiting for the confidence to hear that we're going to be doing something. and even these two weeks are vital weeks in terms of our economic growth and what we would like to see happen. people have to know that come january, they can pay the bills for what they bought in december and we want them to have
a look at america by the numbers and what america looks like by the year 2016. jennifer ortman and william frey here to talk about america by the numbers. we are back in a moment. >> president obama in the reaction to the connecticut shootings. later, the impacts of the so- called fiscal cliff on tax filings. >> president obama on the school shooting in connecticut. he said the time is not to take meaningful action. he was notified by homeland security advisor john brennan. he ordered flags lowered to half staff. this is about 5 minutes. >> i spoke with governor malloy and fbi director muller. i offered governor malloy my condolences on behalf of the nation and made it clear he will have every resource he needs to investigate this crime, care for theirctimw and families. we have endured too many of these tragedies. each time i learned the news, i react not as a president but as anybody else would, as a parent. that was true today. there is not a parent in america who does not feel the same grief i fail. do. the majority of folks who died today were children between the ages of
in america and where you can buy one and what kinds of guns people are allowed to have, that all kind of goes out the window. people can just down load their chosen weapon at home and have it made manifests at their desk, as a fully functioning real-life weapon. we are not far off of that. what's that going to do to work on laws. we have faced technological changes to thinking about guns before. in the late 1980s, advances made it seem inevitable that gunman ewe factturer firms, like glock, for example, would start making fully plastic weapons. and since metal detectors and x-ray machines were and are a major part of how we keep guns out of places that they are not allowed to be in this country, the u.s. congress in 1988 passed something called the undetectable firearms act. it said basically, your gun has to be detectable in an x-ray scanner. it has to have the equivalent x-ray signature of 3.7 ounces of stainless steel, even if you take out the magazine and the stock and the grips. even with those parts taken off, the remaining guts of the gun need to have a substantial metal component. so
was afraid if they could not hold america, the dominoes will fall elsewhere in the british empire. he was wrong about that and he was wrong about a lot. he was a bad decision maker for the british government in the early years. but to blame it all on him would be a great mistake. >> what is your take on the 16 points that were made by thomas jefferson in the virginia constitution and therefore the declaration of independence? >> that is all this stuff about george iii being an ogre and being responsible for everything. that was dressed up for very good reason. if you were urging a revolution, and by political theory of the era, you could overthrow a tyrant. overthrowing a tyrant was ok, it was not a civil war. it was something that had greater justification. in order to make the case they needed heading into the period of wanting to be credible to the other nations so they could gain from france or spain, and this was another reason for the declaration of independence, you had to make george iii out to be a tyrant. sonya, with all these arguments about what he did. that is where tempe
take a look at america by the numbers and what america looks like by the year 2016. jennifer ortman and william frey here to talk about america by the numbers. we are back in a moment. [video clip] >> punch me, straggle mae, take things from me. >> we're starting to see people coming out and talk about their experiences of this phenomenon that some have experienced and had no words for other than growing up. people were starting to stand back and say, "this is not a no part of growing up." there was a moment where there is a possibility for change. we decided to start the film out of that feeling that voices were bubbling up to the surface it to say, this is not something we can accept in our culture. >> she has gathered essays and stories together in "bully." like us on facebook. >> the white house was very controversial, as most things in america were. l'enfant designed washington city. there was a competition and he submitted the design for a palace. americans were not having a palace. it was not particularly awe- inspiring. in fact, in 1821, a european diplomat told the congress
kerry to make america's top diplomat as the country is leaving two wars but facing issues in syria, iranian and north korea. >> john's entire life has prepared him for his role as the son of a foreign service officer. he has a deep respect for the men and women of the state department. the role they play in advancing our interests and values, the risks that they undertake and the sacrifices they make along with their families. >> john mccain congratulated kerry on his nomination and the republican from arizona says he will consider him as secretary of state but did not promise his support. >> my view on whether senator kerry should be secretary of state will not be based on difference of view. we had differences of view going back to 1991 when he said desert storm will fail but it's my view to carry out responsibilities. >> reporter: kerry kept quiet and hillary clinton wasn't able to make it to the white house at all. she is still recovering from the concussion that is preventing from testifying about what she knew before after and during the deadly attack in benghazi. >> heather:
in 1960, i think, was one of the wealth nest city if not the wealthiest city in america and now one of the poorest. >> the fourth largest. >> this is a done deal, going through the house today, to a republican governor and says he will sign it. >> it's symbolic of two things, one, the politics of it all, what we've seen in wisconsin and elsewhere and the unpopularity of unions these days and secondly an economic phenomenon, basically a statement we want jobs and we're willing to take them, even if it means lower wages, fewer benefits, whatever. >> i'm sorry. i actually carried this around because i'm a total dork. have you read "atlantic monthly" article this month on the insourcing boom? you disagree, i can tell. >> he's skeptical. >> he's laughing. he's stoned. >> i'm hungry. >> maybe it suggests that maybe outsourcing was a fad and not a good fad for american business. >> joe, these are stories they love these stories when they happen. the problem is when you get into these situations happening in not very large numbers. here has the really important part. where it's happening is
b back fire in the final hours before america goes over the fiscal cliff. they are trying to craft a plan c. america's news headquarters live from the nowy nation's capitol starts now. >> hello everyone. we are down to the wire and an impatient president obama is leaning on top lawmakers to cut a deal. senate leaders are rushing to hammer out a last ditch compromise. mike emmanuel is live with the latest on the negotiations. >> hi, molly it is it eye critical window. we are not expecting an announcement today, but they are trying to carve out a deal capable of winning bipartisan support. president obama said the u.s. can't afford a self inflicted wound to our economy. >> fortunate lie congress can prevent it from happening if they act right now. i had a good and constructive discussion with senate and house leadership about preventing the tax hike on the middle class and we should be able to reach an agreement to pass both house necessary time. >> senate leaders can't strike a deal. it would be a plan c. keeping tax cuts for those making $250,000 or less . extending unemployment be
and middle class. life will go on. just like life has gone on for the rest of the united states of america. but right now, i think the state of politics is very sad because they're seen -- there seems to be more of a game to be played and positions, one party having the upper hand over the other. not much is going to get done. and you have too many extremes on each side to make things a lot more difficult to run. and it makes it difficult on the president as well. i'm optimistic that the president got reelected, but pessimistic on anything really changing. have leased, anytime soon. -- at least, any time soon. host: and talking about actual change, if there will be a difference on january 1st or otherwise, in terms of taxes, politics, the fiscal cliff, john mckinnon, are any of these expiring? as part of our fiscal cliff series, we're looking at the bush tax cuts that are set to expire unless congress acts, and we are looking at spending cuts. our deductions on the chopping block unless congress acts? are they floating through unless they get rid of them? guest: by and large, most of them
grandchildren. they really are america's children. jack pinto, the same age of my grandson, he was a huge new york giants' fan and today was buried in a giants' jersey. and noah pozner, who is also 6, whose best friend, twin sister, avielle, who was in another class and survived. though, i'm sure she felt she lost her other self. these children were truly innocent. mostly knowing in their short lives just joy and little about the brutality in this world until they experienced it firsthand on friday. what gives us hope was there was also love and bravery in the educators and first responders who acted. we will remember them and pledge that their spirit will be our guiding light to act, to protect our children and our community. i yield back. mr. murphy: i thank the gentlewoman. at this time, i yield 1:30 to the gentleman from florida, mr. deutch. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. mr. deutch: i thank my friend from connecticut. i rise tonight to join all americans in grieving for the innocent children and brave adults slaughtered at sandy hook elementary school last friday.
was doing work around central america, supporting people in central america, protecting against u.s. imperialism, and their right to live. i was doing a lot of work on campus in college. head of work against apartheid. i was involved in a lot of the efforts to push back on efforts to remove affirmative action, prop 209, all kinds of work around ballot measures that were tough, big ideas, like single payer, but i never got involved in supporting a candidate. i never thought that a candidate would be someone that i would support, but when tom and ammiano ran for mayor against willie brown, somehow, i got inspired. i thought, it someone that has integrity and honesty, that comes from the community, could run for mayor, maybe it is we something that can represent the community. i wanted to look at it from a candid perspective. >> when you did run for the border supervisors, what did you learn from that experience, from the campaign? >> from the campaign? so much. you knock on a lot of doors, talk to a lot of people. some of the things were interesting, how connected a lot of people we
has been so much a part of america's history, which is our willingness to invest in the future. that investment is in our children, all children, including poor children, and modern infrastructure, in research, blue sky research. and i think that is, when we get beyond the challenge we face over these next two weeks, i think that's going to be a broader challenge we're going to face. >> we have time for one more question, over here. i just want to say how much support the president has on ensuring fair balance and -- [inaudible] >> richard with trust met andy. so we are basically a biomedical company that helps doctors collaborate better using social media. and i want to ask a question about crossing the valley of death. so our company is very fortunate that we got a small amount of innovation funding from health care their monies. but it's really a broader questions about the health care ecosystem. in silicon valley a company goes under, software engineers find new jobs in a matter of weeks. but in biotech we have people, a lot of people with ph.d's and they are much more long
america anchor and former traveling press secretary for the obama campaign jen socky. this is the speed of the fiscal cliff negotiations. blink and you just might miss exactly nothing. while talks between speaker boehner and president obama over the past three days have been shrouded in secrecy, we've learned there have been two offers put on the table. the white house sent boehner a proposal on monday calling for $1.4 trillion in tax revenue, $200 billion less than the original offer. might that seal the deal? >> the president's called for $1.4 trillion worth of revenue. that cannot pass the house or the senate. >> okay then. the speaker's office responded with a deal of its own. yesterday it included precisely the same amount of revenue from the original proposal, $800 billion, which indicates there may have been concessions else where. a democratic source close to the white house tells nbc news the proposal included a permanent extension of the bush tax cuts. that is highly unlikely to fly, given the hard line the president has taken on tax rates and what he told barbara walters in a
.01%, it amounted to about 4.2 million per family. so when you think about why is there this polarization in america, why are there these very different views about the world, you know, part of it is there are very different worlds that people are inhabits. having said that, so, you know, my premise is this isn't just a case of the rich have always been with us. something really different is happening, and it's important for us to talk about it, to research it, to figure out what's going on. but actually, there is a real reluctance, and i have admit particularly here in america, and i'm canadian, so i see you guys with a little bit of a distance. [laughter] particularly in america there is a reluctance to talk about these issues of income distribution. and one of my friends who was supposed to be here tonight, i talked to him about this, and he said that it's -- i'm going to quote him because it was such a nice line. so he said: i was once told by the head of a prestigious think tank in washington, d.c. that the think tank's board was very unlikely to fund any work that had income or wealth inequali
not hold america, the dominoes will fall in the rest of the british empire. he was a bad decision maker for the british government in the early years. to blame it all on him would be a mistake. >> what is your take on the 16 points that were made by thomas jefferson in the virginia constitution and then the declaration of independence? >> all that stuff about george iii being an ogre and responsible for everything, if your urging a revolution, by political theory, you could overthrow retired. -- a tyrant. overthrowing a tyrant would be a good thing. in order to make the case they needed heading into wanting to be credible to the other nations, such as france or spain whatever, you had to make george iii out to be a tyrant. so he came up with all of these arguments about what he did and that is with jefferson did. >> what did you think? >> i was not a big jeffersonian after i did all of this. he was a wordsmith. he was not a good executive when he was governor of virginia. he was not able to organize effective resistance. he wasn't famous until he was famous in the sense that we know his
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. it is a brighter day that lays ahead for us. [applause] jack hated the idea that any part of america could be written off. in the 1970's, when people spoke of scarcity, jack was talking about an american renaissance. not everyone listens. ronald reagan sure did. you saw jack's ideas at work in the economic expansion of the 1980's in 1990's. -- and 1990's. nothing could be more foreign to jack's way of thinking than to accept poverty as a permanent way of life. he did not believe we all belong to some class or station in life. he went into a lot of troubled neighborhoods. never once did he look around and despair. others might think it is never going to get better than that. not jack kemp. he did not buy into that attitude, and neither do we or most americans. america is exceptional for this very reason. both parties tend to divide americans into our voters and their voters. let's be really clear. republicans must steer far clear of that trap. [applause] we need to speak to the aspirations and a zaydis of every american -- and anxieties of every american. so no one is left out from the prom
.88 or select playdoh sets, only ten dollars. all backed by our low price guarantee. america's gift headquarters. walmart. >>> all right. 25 past the hour. time now to take a look at the "morning papers." we'll start with the "usa today." nonvoters have some ideas on how to make voting easier. the top suggestion, according to a new poll, 28% of nonvoters say being able to cast their ballots online would make them more willing to participate in the electoral process. during this year's presidential election, turnout dropped to an estimated 57.5% of eligible u.s. citizens. >> "the new york times," co-inventor of the modern bar code died on sunday at the age of 91. woodland who patented the technology almost 60 years ago developed the idea as a student at drexel university after the head of a local grocery store asked the engineering department for help advancing the checkout process. >> from our "parade of papers," "the los angeles times." sales of chewing tobacco and other smokeless products have risen sharply in california while usage among high school students jumped 3.9% in 2010. nationwide th
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